Home Repair Tips for Joining Piping and Piping

There are four ways to connect pipes and tubes:

o To pour lead into the joint

o To screw together threaded pipes and fittings

o To weld

o To glue or cement

Plumbers time sealed black iron pipe joints with hot liquid lead. Today, however, the sewer pipes are joined with pliers and neoprene joints.

Most galvanized pipes are threaded. They can be screwed together without any preparation, but the seal will flow until it rust. It is also very difficult to turn the pipes. Teflon tape facilitates work and seals joints. Be careful though. Teflon makes threads turn so easily that you can squeeze them too far and break the hose.

Copper tubes are generally welded. Clean the joint with steel wool or wallpaper. Do not touch the seal after cleaning. Your fingers may leave grease that will repel the solder. Apply a light coat of non-corrosive solder flux to the ends to be bonded, both inside and out. Assemble the joint exactly as it will be when finished.

Now light a propane torch. When the flame stabilizes, move the torch so that the blue tip of the flame is between 1/2 and 3/4 inch from the seal. Heat the entire joint and along the piping 2 to 3 inches in all directions. Look where you are pointing the flame. Heat until the stream starts to boil. Do not overheat.

Remove the torch and touch the weld at the end of the gasket. If the seal is clean and fluxed and has been heated to the correct temperature, the weld will melt immediately and flow throughout the joint. Do not move the seal until the solder has cooled down. If the seal is too hot, the solder does not stick. In this case, use pliers to pull the flame down, move the torch so that the blue tip of the flame is 1/2 to 3/4 "away from the seal. Heat the entire joint and along the piping 2 to 3 inches in all directions. Look where you are pointing the flame. Heat until the stream starts to boil. Do not overheat.

Remove the torch and touch the weld at the end of the gasket. If the seal is clean and flowed and has been heated to the correct temperature, the weld will melt immediately and flow through the entire joint. Do not move the seal until the solder has cooled down. If the seal is too hot, the solder does not stick. In this case, use a pliers to separate the hot seal. Let it cool, clean it, melt it and start again.

It is impossible to sell a wet seal. Even a drop of water is too much. If you have closed all the valves and opened all the faucets, and water is still flowing in the pipe, place some bread in the line. This will stop the water long enough to solder. Later when you turn on the water, the bread will dissolve and be rinsed off by the nearest faucet.

Plastic pipe joints are the same as copper pipe joints, except that they are cemented instead of being welded. After cutting and cleaning the decks with a file and a knife, brush the cement around the outside of the pipe and inside the fitting. Plastic cement is really a solvent that dissolves the plastic surface. When it evaporates (in about 10 seconds), the joint is fused. This does not give you much time to position the seal and wipe off excess cement. Once the plastic pipe has been glued, there is no way to disassemble it except by cutting it.

Use plastic cement with great care. Avoid breathing vapors and keep them away from eyes, mouth and skin.

Before welding copper tubes, clean the ends to be assembled. Use sandpaper, steel wool or a wire brush. Then, with your finger or an old toothbrush, apply flux to the surfaces to be assembled. Use a light coat, but cover the area completely.

To attach a plastic pipe, cut the pipe, clean the cut edge with a pocket knife, file or sandpaper. Brush the cement to the outside of the pipe and to the inside of the fitting. Join and hold for 10 seconds. There is no way to separate this articulation again.



Source by Matt Crook

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