Women Health Tips

Women Health Tips

THE DECOLUTION OF THE NUTRITIONAL VALUE IN FRUIT AND VEGETABLES MAY BE CONCERN.

For years, the debate has raged on the advantages and disadvantages of modern agricultural techniques. Industrial agriculture or "hyper-agriculture" has solved giant leaps in crop yields, but many claim nutrient content – and so their total nutritional value to humans – has suffered.
The average yield in terms of bushels per acre for major crops in the United States has exploded since the 1950s. Corn is up 342%! Wheat is up 290% while soy beans and alfalfa are up about 170%. Similar sections of yield gains have also been observed in Europe, Australia, Japan and other parts of the world.

Data presented by researchers from the Soils Science Department of the University of Wisconsin in Madison show that, although these advances have been significant over the past 50 years, nutrient content has been under siege and declined. Similarly, a review of data published by USDA's ARC nutrient data laboratory shows "a sharp decline in minerals, vitamins, and other nutrients in foods since the last comprehensive survey," there are about 20 years.

NEW PROOFS ON NUTRIENT DEPLETION

Recent data published by Dr. David Thomas, a primary health care practitioner and independent researcher, examined the difference between the tables published by the British government in 1940 and in 2002. was revealing. He showed that the iron content of 15 different varieties of meat had decreased by 47%. Dairy products showed similar falls; a drop of 60% of iron and up to 90% of copper.

MORE AVAILABILITY VERSUS LESS VALUE.

It is true that in the modern world of industrialized countries, the availability of fruits and vegetables is at a record level. If we want it, it's there. On the other hand specifically this increase in availability, consumption of fruits and vegetables has not increased in the population. In fact, in many subgroups of the population, it has decreased. When this knowledge is coupled with reported declines in nutrient levels in foods, many health care providers, scientists, researchers and government officials are looking for answers on how we can hope to maintain nutritional value and balance of our food while producing more and more from the same soil to feed an ever growing population. Until now, the road ahead is uncertain.

NEW STUDIES SHOW A PROTECTIVE LINK BETWEEN TEA, FRUIT AND VEGETABLE CONSUMPTION AND WOMEN'S HEALTH.

Cancer risk of tea and ovarian: Researchers from the Division of Nutritional Epidemiology of the Karolinska Institute of Stockholm conducted a follow-up study over 15 years of over 61 000 women aged 40 to 76 years old. (2005; 165 (22): 2683-2686) showed that women who regularly ate tea had a significantly lower risk of ovarian cancer. Tea drinkers who averaged less than a cup a day equaled a risk reduction of 18%. One or more cups a day reduced the risk by 24% and 2 cups or more a day showed a 46% risk reduction. As you might expect, these findings prompted researchers to conclude that "the results suggest that tea consumption is associated with a reduced risk of ovarian cancer."

Soy and Women Health: Publishing their work in the January 15, 2006 issue of Cancer Research, a team of researchers from West Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USA concluded that phytoestrogens from soy could protect against breast cancer. postmenopausal women. According to researchers at Johns Hopkins University presenting data at the American Heart Association meeting of November 15, 2005, consuming soy protein (20 grams per day for 6 weeks) has reduced two indicators of coronary heart disease in African-American women. The result shows that LDL cholesterol and another cholesterol marker known as LDL-P (P = number of particles) decreased in women taking soy protein, regardless of age or race .

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Source by Solomon Etaghene

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